Knowledge communicates confidence and trust.

 
 

Providers need committed agents to serve their members.

 
 

Online platforms are redefining how members will interact with carriers, providers and doctors.

ABOUT US

New Health Partners is a Health Insurance Broker Agency. We form true partnerships with our agents, carriers and providers, making the best use of technology and data to deliver targeted member growth. Our core products are Medicare Advantage and the Affordable Care Act. Our founding team has over 30 years’ experience as an FMO, MSO and call center. This unique combination integrates industries that offer value to agents, carriers and doctor practices. This is a relationship business. Daily, we help agents promote their services, carriers find potential providers and medical practices review their contract scores and efficiencies.

We encourage our agents to visit doctors, starting with their own Primary.  It is refreshing to us that often, an agent has not told their own doctor what they do. We visit practices with our agents to identify any area where our knowledge can promote growth. We might recommend a new carrier, put together a marketing plan or analyze contracts in place to see if through our relationships and experience we can improve scores.  The agent becomes an invaluable and free sales and marketing representative for the doctor.

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OUR SERVICES

EO-insurance-reimbursements

E&O and AHIP

Partners producing a minimum of 15 new policies per year receive an E&O and AHIP credit.

Leads-for-Medicare-Advantag

Leads for Medicare Advantage

We know this to be one, if not the biggest challenge to an agent. Our lead program generates compliant Medicare Advantage appointments.

AHIP-Discount-linkss

Carriers and practices

We identify partnerships between carriers and practices, providing contracting help, network adequacy recommendations and retention programs. Our team provides score analysis, benchmarks and risk management to improve HEDIS and MRA measures.

Marketing plans

On a one to one basis we help you put together strategies which include grassroot and social media marketing.

Doctor-relationship-managem

Doctor relationship management

Our most successful agent partners work with providers as their Medicare Advantage and Affordable Care Act experts.  We help you develop relationships and introduce agents to practices we identify with potential for growth.

CRMs

CRM

Our agents and agencies have access to our CRM to manage leads, social media and agents.

OUR TEAM

FACTS

Explosive Growth

The health insurance market is experiencing the most explosive growth in decades.

Technology

Clients of ALL ages are tech savvy and usage of devices to shop for health insurance is growing exponentially.

Good Communication

Electronic communication between health plans, consumers and providers will increase.

TESTIMONIALS

RECENT POSTS

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Oscar Launches New $0 Virtual Primary Care as Part of 2021 Expansion Plans

By | Affordable Care Act, health insurance
Oscar, the first tech-driven health insurance company, announced plans to launch its new $0 Virtual Primary Care product and expand to a total of 19 states and 47 markets in 2021. The company will offer health insurance to individuals and families in four new states and 19 new markets during the upcoming Open Enrollment period, pending regulatory approvals.

Virtual Primary Care is the latest addition to the suite of Oscar Care features that provide a personalized experience for Oscar members. Oscar Care, which includes access to Oscar designated virtual primary and urgent providers, offers our members with Individual and Family Plans.

Virtual Primary Care: $0, unlimited virtual visits with a dedicated team of Oscar primary care providers. Tier 1 prescriptions, DME, labs, diagnostic imaging orders, and initial specialist referrals prescribed by an Oscar Primary Care provider are also $0. Oscar Primary Care also will bring some care directly to members in their homes, by offering $0 vitals monitoring kits and in-home lab draws when ordered by an Oscar Primary Care provider.

Virtual Urgent Care: 24/7 access to Oscar Virtual Urgent Care Providers at $0 for whenever a member needs to see a doctor quickly. Tier 1 prescriptions and labs are $0 when prescribed by our virtual urgent care providers, too.

Care Teams: Dedicated Care Guides, including a nurse, who know the member’s medical history, help them navigate their plan, and connect them with in-network providers.

“With the launch of Oscar Primary Care, Oscar is making even more unprecedented, cost-effective plans available. Americans consistently cite cost, quality, and convenience as their biggest struggles with the healthcare system – our new offering solves for all of them.” – Oscar Co-Founder and CEO Mario Schlosser.

5.4 million Americans have lost health insurance in coronavirus-driven recession, analysis finds

By | Uncategorized
A patient is wheeled into Cobble Hill Health Center by emergency medical workers in Brooklyn on April 17, 2020.
A patient is wheeled into Cobble Hill Health Center by emergency medical workers in Brooklyn on April 17, 2020. (John Minchillo/AP)

The coronavirus pandemic stripped an estimated 5.4 million American workers of their health insurance between February and May, a stretch in which more adults became uninsured because of job losses than have ever lost coverage in a single year, according to a new analysis.

The study, to be announced Tuesday by the nonpartisan consumer advocacy group Families USA, found that the estimated increase in uninsured workers from February to May was nearly 40% higher than the highest previous increase, which occurred during the recession of 2008 and 2009, when 3.9 million adults lost insurance.

The studies come in the thick of the campaign season, when health care — and in particular the future of the Affordable Care Act, popularly known as Obamacare — will be a major issue. Democrats and their presumptive presidential nominee, Joe Biden, want to expand the law. President Donald Trump has asked the Supreme Court to overturn it.

Four of every five people who have lost employer-provided health insurance during the coronavirus pandemic are eligible for free coverage through expanded Medicaid programs or government-subsidized private insurance through the Obama-era health law, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

But experts say that insuring the recently unemployed is a difficult challenge. Many people cannot afford premiums for coverage through either the health care law or the program known as COBRA, for the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act. Others might not know they are eligible for Medicaid.

The White House and Congress have done little to help. The Trump administration has imposed sharp cuts on the funding for outreach programs that assist people in signing up for coverage under the health law. And while House Democrats have passed legislation intended to help people to keep their health insurance, the bill is stuck in the Republican-controlled Senate.

Rather than expand access to subsidized insurance under the Affordable Care Act, Trump has promised to directly reimburse hospitals for the care of coronavirus patients who have lost their insurance. But there is little evidence that has begun.

“Helping people keep their insurance through a public health crisis surprisingly has not gotten much attention,” said Larry Levitt, executive vice president for health policy at the Kaiser Family Foundation. “This is the first recession in which the ACA is there as a safety net, but it’s an imperfect safety net.”

The Families USA study is a state-by-state examination of the effects of the pandemic on laid-off adults younger than 65, the age at which Americans become eligible for Medicare. It found that nearly half — 46% — of the coverage losses from the pandemic came in five states: California, Texas, Florida, New York and North Carolina.

In Texas alone, the number of uninsured jumped from about 4.3 million to nearly 4.9 million; 3 out of every 10 Texans are uninsured, the research found. In the 37 states that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, 23%t of laid-off workers became uninsured; the percentage was nearly double that — 43% — in the 13 states that did not expand Medicaid, which include Texas, Florida and North Carolina.

Five states have experienced increases in the number of uninsured adults that exceed 40%, the analysis found. In Massachusetts, the number nearly doubled, rising by 93% — a figure Dorn attributed to a large number of people losing employer-based coverage there. Across the country as a whole, more than 1 in 7 adults — 16% — is now uninsured, the analysis found.

To generate the estimates, Dorn examined the number of laid-off workers in each state and calculated how many had become uninsured based on coverage patterns since 2014, when the central provisions of the Affordable Care Act went into effect. The underlying data for those patterns comes from work published by the Urban Institute in April.

Although analysts will have a clearer picture of the actual figures next year, Dorn said, “policymakers need to know now what the approximate magnitude is of insurance losses to decide what they need to do. So this is our best estimate for what the actual coverage losses have been.”

Democrats and health care advocacy groups argue that the importance of insurance coverage extends beyond personal well-being because the uninsured tend to avoid going to the doctor, and that exposes others to an infectious disease outbreak like COVID-19.

On Capitol Hill, Sen. Patty Murray of Washington, the top Democrat on the Senate health committee, has pressed the Trump administration to do a better job of promoting a provision in the Affordable Care Act that creates a special enrollment period for people who lose their jobs.

Murray and other Democrats have also called for the federal government to provide financial assistance to help workers who are laid off maintain their coverage through COBRA, and to give states that have refused to expand Medicaid an incentive to do so, by increasing the federal share of the cost.

Examining the 10 Year Anniversary of the Affordable Care Act

By | Uncategorized

In March of 2010, nearly ten years ago, Democrats signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.  Now considered one of the biggest pieces of health care legislation put together by U.S. legislators.

In retrospect, professor emeritus at Washington and Lee University and health policy expert, Timothy Stoltzfus Jost has stated the ACA has accomplished a lot, but has also left a fragmented health system divided by private and public sectors.

“The ACA made major reforms in health care delivery, finance, addressing access, cost and quality,” Jost said. “Its reach is far greater than is commonly understood, yet while it revolutionized many parts of the U.S. health care system, it did not revolutionize the system itself. Much remains to be done.”

Jost, and as members of the Obama administration recently attended a joint conference at the Yale University, as well as University of Pennsylvania to focus on the formation, implementation and impact of the ACA.

“We barely got the Affordable Care Act through with support of the hospitals, the physicians, the pharmaceutical lobby and 60 votes in the Senate,”  he said, “and right now, we’re not anywhere close to that.”

According to Nancy-Ann De Parle, president Obama’s former deputy chief of staff for policy, candidates and experts should instead be looking at ways to build upon the existing system.

During the conference at Yale, DeParle states “I would not waste time trying to invent the wheel, I would try to improve the structure that’s already there.”

Once it was signed into law, the ACA began the expansion of coverage to millions of people in the United States, across different socio economic classes. The largest changes shown to affect low and middle-income citizens. It also expanded coverage for young adults by allowing them to remain under their parents insurance until the age of 26, and required the coverage of pre-existing conditions. Further advantages eliminated lifetime limits and expanded coverage for preventative services.

A handful of states, including Connecticut, also established their own state exchange systems, called Access health CT. This led now patient advocate Gaye Hyre, of West Haven, to acquire an ACA plan to cover her cancer treatments and other basic health care needs.

However she states the coverage is not without its flaws.

“The fact is, on the ground, you can have your insurance, but the equitable access to the actual care is compromised because people will not take that insurance, therefore it is stigmatized,” Hyre said. “How is the patient, the person at the end of the policy, supposed to cope with all of this?”

Rising premiums and deductibles, and few carriers in rural areas are just some of the issues making it difficult for patients to afford their health insurance are some of the issues the panel of experts has acknowledged.

They also stated the Trump administration and GOP legislators continue to dismantle and roll back aspects of the health law with the long term goal to repeal the ACA. Health policy economics specialist Joseph Antos stated “What would Republicans have supported in place of the ACA? That wasn’t clear 10 years ago, and it is even less today.”

Currently the ACA is being challenged in a lawsuit as to whether or not it is constitutional, brought forth by 18 GOP state attorneys general.  Despite additional problems including funding costs, the ACA is not considered a loss. Attorney and professor at Boston University School of Law, said policy makers can learn from the past in order to move forward.

“There are lessons to be learned from the difficulty from its rollout and I think also lessons to be learned whether or not we can have this patchwork public or private non-system and continue to roll along with it,” she said. “My sense … is that people are still not getting what they need for all the money that we spend.”

Leonard N. (2019, Oct. 7.) 10 Years Of The Affordable Care Act: What Now? Retrieved  from /www.wnpr.org

 

 

 

2020 Sees New Cigna Expansion to Include Obamacare Coverage

By | Uncategorized

Cigna announces plans to become the latest insurer to expand individual coverage to include the Affordable Care Act across 10 states and 19 markets for the 2020 open enrollment period.

Wednesday, Cigna explained their plan “includes expansion into select counties in Kansas, South Florida and Utah as well as new counties in Tennessee and Virginia,” while exchange plans are already in place for eight states: Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Missouri, North Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia.

Cigna, one of few national health insurance carriers to find success in individual coverage under the ACA, recently purchased the pharmacy benefit manager Express Scripts. This is a significant difference from company rivals Aetna, CVS Health, Humana and United Health group who unsuccessfully managed the cost of health coverage for sick patients signing up.

The nonperformance has left Blue Cross plans and Centene in the position of major provider of coverage, with the latter having grown its Obamacare to approximately 2 million enrollees within 20 states. More plans for expansion have been announced, with Centene in position to become a major player, should it succeed in acquisition of WellCare Health Plans next year.

In a statement by Brian Evanko, president of Cigna’s government business, “More people who purchase health care coverage on the exchange now will have access to Cigna’s broad range of products and services that makes quality health care more accessible and affordable,” going on to add “We’ve learned from our thoughtful approach and continuous presence on the exchange how to deliver a great product with a simplified customer experience. We are proud to be able to deliver our exceptional offering to even more people throughout the U.S.”

Japsen, B. (2019, Sept. 18). Cigna, Too, Will Expand Obamacare Coverage to More States in 2020. Retrieved from www.forbes.com

2020 Sees New Cigna Expansion to Include Obamacare Coverage

By | Uncategorized

According to a recent Forbes article by B. Japsen, Cigna announces plans to become the latest insurer to expand individual coverage to include the Affordable Care Act across 10 states and 19 markets for the 2020 open enrollment period.

Wednesday, Cigna explained their plan “includes expansion into select counties in Kansas, South Florida and Utah as well as new counties in Tennessee and Virginia,” while exchange plans are already in place for eight states: Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Missouri, North Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia.

Cigna, one of few national health insurance carriers to find success in individual coverage under the ACA, recently purchased the pharmacy benefit manager Express Scripts. This is a significant difference from company rivals Aetna, CVS Health, Humana and United Health group who unsuccessfully managed the cost of health coverage for sick patients signing up.

The nonperformance has left Blue Cross plans and Centene in the position of major provider of coverage, with the latter having grown its Obamacare to approximately 2 million enrollees within 20 states. More plans for expansion have been announced, with Centene in position to become a major player, should it succeed in acquisition of WellCare Health Plans next year.

In a statement by Brian Evanko, president of Cignas government business, “More people who purchase health care coverage on the exchange now will have access to Cigna’s broad range of products and services that makes quality health care more accessible and affordable,” going on to add “We’ve learned from our thoughtful approach and continuous presence on the exchange how to deliver a great product with a simplified customer experience. We are proud to be able to deliver our exceptional offering to even more people throughout the U.S.”

Japsen, B. (2019, Sept. 18). Cigna, Too, Will Expand Obamacare Coverage to More States in 2020. Retrieved from www.forbes.com

New Mexico Health Insurance Exchange Starting New Regulations

By | Uncategorized

Individuals and small businesses signing up for the state’s health insurance exchange are in store for new changes during the open enrollment period.

As of October 1st, small businesses will be able to contribute any dollar amount, including zero, down to employee plans. Previously a 40% contribution was necessary.

Eliminating the minimum contribution gives employers “the flexibility to decide what might match their upcoming budget,” said Jeffery Bustamante, interim CEO of beWellnm, the state insurance exchange, and director of policy and compliance for the exchange.

Typically small employer groups purchase coverage through the state exchange, paying approximately 75% of employee health insurance premiums, Bustamante told the Journal.

According to Bustamante, New Mexico is “A competitive marketplace for coverage,” each county having four carriers, some offering four tiers of coverage ranging from bronze, silver, gold and platinum. Typically bronze plans have the lowest premiums but highest copays and deductibles, with Platinum having higher premiums but lower out of pocket expenses.

Prior to the change, employees had to stay within tiers in plans to which their employers contributed, however a new feature enables employees to buy up or down within their employer provided health plans.

New Mexico’s health insurance exchange for individuals, which currently can be accessed online at HealthCare.gov, eventually will join small businesses on a new state-run platform at beWellnm.com. The new platform will be launched in the fall of 2021, with enrollment beginning on January 1, 2022.

“We’re doing it because we anticipate it will come at a cost savings to the state, and give us more control over our own destiny and more control over our own data,” Bustamante said. The change will put administrators of the exchange in a position to “know our population with much more clarity.”

More than 600 employer groups and 47,000 individuals have already bought health insurance on the state exchange.

High Disenrollment For Off-Exchange Individual Health Plans

By | Uncategorized

A new 2019 report from the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) has showed a strong decrease in individual health insurance markets following an individual health insurance market growth of 6.8 million enrollees compared to a 17.4 million enrollee increase in 2015 when the Affordable Care Act was first introduced.  As it stands approximately 651,000 fewer individuals are currently enrolled in individual health insurance.

Despite stabilized ACA exchanges and premiums, individual enrollment continues to go decline with KFF attributing the change to plans that are not ACA compliant, with less regulation and shifts to employer sponsored coverage.

KFF’s research determined that approximately 4000,000 individuals have left the plans due to the premium increases and mandate penalty repeal, with off-exchange plans experiencing the largest dip in enrollment.

The research also showed that between 2016 and 2018 the highest declines coincide within states that have the largest premium hikes. While there are many influences in the decline or enrollment and premium fluctuations, researched argued that “While there may be no signs of the individual market collapsing, there remain concerns about affordability of coverage for people who do not qualify for a subsidy, many of whom have already left the individual market,”

Projections currently show that enrollment may stabilize in the years to come so long as subsidies are available to enrollees.

CMS Star Rating Implementation for Insurance Plans

By | Uncategorized

In a move to drive toward transparency and better quality in the healthcare system, HealthCare.gov has recently announced the State Obamacare exchange websites will begin publishing quality star ratings for insurance plans.

Toward the start of the 2020 plan year, a five-star quality rating system will be implemented similar to Medicare Advantage. The now-nationwide policy will award a number of stars dependent on how enrollees rate their in-network doctors, received care, customer service, and overall experience. All state exchange sites, and HealthCare.gov will display the ratings.

The idea first began in 2017 when the CMS started experimenting with limited pilots in Virginia and Wisconsin. Later, during the 2019 open enrollment period, the pilots rolled out in three additional states.

CMS states the star ratings may not be universally available yet in new or low enrollment plans. Additionally, the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission recommends additional changes.

A statement by the CMS Administrator, Seema Verma states “This addresses our strongly held commitment to equip consumers with the tools they need to find the best choice possible. Increasing transparency and competition drive better quality and cost, with consumers benefiting the most.”

 The FFM certification also states that if at all possible have a written consent from the consumer to work on their behalf as the agent.  These are incremental moves to imitate compliance requirement as in Medicare Advantage providing additional protections for the consumer.  Not sure however, if a full-blown SOA process will allow enough time during the current OE cycle and if implemented, a six-month enrollment period would be necessary.

 

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